The love of knowledge is a kind of madness.
― C.S. Lewis, Out of the Silent Planet

I’ve always been really good at predicting digital and cultural trends. So much so that I’ve made my living doing it for most of the last decade. But even I have my biases. I was such a music snob and loved owning music that I couldn’t imagine not ever buying albums. 
I remember back in 2005 I read this book, The Future of Music: Manifesto for the Digital Music Revolution and thinking the authors were completely insane. They were talking about paying for streaming music like a utility, that we’d quit “owning” music and stop buying albums and would instead pay monthly fees to access unlimited music. I thought it was the stupidest thing I’d ever heard. It turned out to be the biggest trend I’ve ever completely missed.
Streaming, an interactive report from Pitchfork, tells the next phase of the story.  

From YouTube, to Pandora, to Spotify, streaming music is piloting our listening habits in fascinating new ways that both upend old hierarchies and recall innovations of previous eras. Eric Harvey explores how these developments are affecting ideas of taste, access, and ownership today—and what this shift means for fans and artists alike—in our latest Cover Story.

I’ve always been really good at predicting digital and cultural trends. So much so that I’ve made my living doing it for most of the last decade. But even I have my biases. I was such a music snob and loved owning music that I couldn’t imagine not ever buying albums. 

I remember back in 2005 I read this book, The Future of Music: Manifesto for the Digital Music Revolution and thinking the authors were completely insane. They were talking about paying for streaming music like a utility, that we’d quit “owning” music and stop buying albums and would instead pay monthly fees to access unlimited music. I thought it was the stupidest thing I’d ever heard. It turned out to be the biggest trend I’ve ever completely missed.

Streaming, an interactive report from Pitchfork, tells the next phase of the story.  

From YouTube, to Pandora, to Spotify, streaming music is piloting our listening habits in fascinating new ways that both upend old hierarchies and recall innovations of previous eras. Eric Harvey explores how these developments are affecting ideas of taste, access, and ownership today—and what this shift means for fans and artists alike—in our latest Cover Story.

(Source: pitchfork)

Reading Ready Player One by Ernest Cline

Why did it take me so long to read Ready Player One? Everyone told me it was excellent. They told me it was a futuristic dystopian sci-fi book filled with 80’s references. And yet it still took me four years to read it. I have no excuses. I feel shame. – View on Path.

fastcodesign:

"It’s the buzz that makes the lightsaber sound dangerous." - How The “Star Wars” Lightsaber Was Designed

The lightsaber is such a wonderful blend of old and new. For me it kind of optimizes Star Wars.

fastcodesign:

"It’s the buzz that makes the lightsaber sound dangerous."How The “Star Wars” Lightsaber Was Designed

The lightsaber is such a wonderful blend of old and new. For me it kind of optimizes Star Wars.

(via fastcompany)

The 3D Printer That Serves Dinner
I don’t know about you, but I can’t wait for the day when my 3D printer prints me off a juicy slab of lab grown meat steak. 

The 3D Printer That Serves Dinner

I don’t know about you, but I can’t wait for the day when my 3D printer prints me off a juicy slab of lab grown meat steak. 

(Source: motherboardtv)

fastcompany:

Millennials Don’t Care About Owning Cars, And Car Makers Can’t Figure Out Why
"What auto manufacturers, along with much of corporate America are missing here is that the vehicles to freedom and personal identity have changed for this generation. The sooner brands get a grip on this reality the sooner they can make adjustments in how they market to and communicate with this core group, which is essential to their long-term success."
More> Co.Exist

What’s even more amazing about this fact is that the number of cars fell among Millennials, which is a group twice as numerous as the previous generation Gen X.
So car sales declined while the available market was growing. 

fastcompany:

Millennials Don’t Care About Owning Cars, And Car Makers Can’t Figure Out Why

"What auto manufacturers, along with much of corporate America are missing here is that the vehicles to freedom and personal identity have changed for this generation. The sooner brands get a grip on this reality the sooner they can make adjustments in how they market to and communicate with this core group, which is essential to their long-term success."

More> Co.Exist

What’s even more amazing about this fact is that the number of cars fell among Millennials, which is a group twice as numerous as the previous generation Gen X.

So car sales declined while the available market was growing. 

(via miketrap)

futurescope:

Biodegradable battery could melt inside the body
From Nature:


Medical implants would monitor vital signs or dispense therapies before vanishing.
A biodegradable, implantable battery could help in the development of biomedical devices that monitor tissue or deliver treatments before being reabsorbed by the body after use.
“This is a really major advance,” says Jeffrey Borenstein, a biomedical engineer at Draper Laboratory, a non-profit research and development centre in Cambridge, Massachusetts. “Until recently, there has not been a lot of progress in this area.”

[read more]


Having toxic batteries in your body, doesn’t sound like a good thing, but I’m not sure biodegradable batteries sounds great either. I know they have biodegradable stitches but for the most part, I don’t know I want my body to absorb any type of medical device. And as far as batteries go, the body is full of electricity it seems like there should be a way to tap into that (that’s why the machine’s want to keep us around isn’t it?). Very interesting though. 

futurescope:

Biodegradable battery could melt inside the body

From Nature:

Medical implants would monitor vital signs or dispense therapies before vanishing.

A biodegradable, implantable battery could help in the development of biomedical devices that monitor tissue or deliver treatments before being reabsorbed by the body after use.

“This is a really major advance,” says Jeffrey Borenstein, a biomedical engineer at Draper Laboratory, a non-profit research and development centre in Cambridge, Massachusetts. “Until recently, there has not been a lot of progress in this area.”

[read more]

Having toxic batteries in your body, doesn’t sound like a good thing, but I’m not sure biodegradable batteries sounds great either. I know they have biodegradable stitches but for the most part, I don’t know I want my body to absorb any type of medical device. And as far as batteries go, the body is full of electricity it seems like there should be a way to tap into that (that’s why the machine’s want to keep us around isn’t it?). Very interesting though. 

Artist Adds ‘Star Wars’ Characters and Vehicles to Old Thrift Store Paintings
Pretty much the best art ever.

Do you think Ocular Rift will come with Instagram filters?

brycedotvc:

Saw this shortly after seeing a tweet from Pincus:

My rule of thumb for entrepreneurs. Your Instincts are right 95% of the time, your ideas 25%. Fall in love with instincts. Kill ideas often.

brycedotvc:

Saw this shortly after seeing a tweet from Pincus:

My rule of thumb for entrepreneurs. Your Instincts are right 95% of the time, your ideas 25%. Fall in love with instincts. Kill ideas often.

turnabout:

nevver:

1920

Everything old is new again

Awesome 1920’s group selfie. 

(via meganwest)

"How can you be so obtuse?" 

One of my favorite scenes from this movie. 

(Source: fyeahshawshankredemption, via tribecafilm)

Could Mind-Jail and Psychoactive Drugs Fix Overcrowded Prisons?

Roache claims that tinkering with the mind to alter the prison system is only a scary idea because it’s new. But I’d argue it’s just scary, period. Imagine the streets seething with half-lobotomized ex-cons that we decided to do some experiments on. Could we even imprison them at that point? Who could blame them for their actions after having their minds fooled into thinking they were locked up for 1,000 years?

This is just a bad idea all around.

Could Mind-Jail and Psychoactive Drugs Fix Overcrowded Prisons?

Roache claims that tinkering with the mind to alter the prison system is only a scary idea because it’s new. But I’d argue it’s just scary, period. Imagine the streets seething with half-lobotomized ex-cons that we decided to do some experiments on. Could we even imprison them at that point? Who could blame them for their actions after having their minds fooled into thinking they were locked up for 1,000 years?

This is just a bad idea all around.

"Can’t rely on anyone these days. You gotta do everything yourself. It’s a funny world we live in." The Joker 

(Source: jamesbadgedale, via tribecafilm)

Absurd Creature of the Week: The Incredible Critter That’s Tough Enough to Survive in Space 
WTH? Our world is filled with crazy things. #TIL
HP plans 3D printer announcement for June

There’s a lot of “buzz and hype” around 3D printing, but the systems available now have two big challenges, Whitman said at HP’s shareholder meeting. One is that they’re deathly slow.
“It’s like watching ice melt,” she said.
The other, according to Whitman, is that the quality isn’t as good as it should be. “The surface of the substrate is not perfect,” she said.
“We believe we have solved both these problems and we’ll be making a big technology announcement in June around how we are going to approach this,” Whitman said.
That doesn’t mean HP will release products at that time, but it implies the company will show what it’s working on and where it’s heading.
Whitman said it will target the business market first, where it thinks there’s demand for systems that can be used to print prototypes and finished products.

HP knows printing, but can they win with 3D Printing? (Full disclosure, I used to at HP, in the Imaging and Printing division, several years ago.) They have a lot of tech and understanding in printing technology. (Their LaserJet and InkJet printers are the most profitable IT products EVER!) They probably also have a lot of IP that will help them in this space. 
But the fact that this is yet another B2B Enterprise play, is worrying to me. Yes, 3D Printing as a service will be where the majority of this market is headed, but the innovation and use cases is driven by the hackers and makers. By targeting B2B, they’ll never get ahead of this trend and will forever be chasing it. Unless they come out with something truly revolutionary, like multi-material, complex printing, at a fraction of the current cost, I wouldn’t expect HP to be a major player in this space. They haven’t even been able to get ahead of electrical conducting printing (circuits) by hacking an ink-jet printer. Why didn’t HP do that? 

HP plans 3D printer announcement for June

There’s a lot of “buzz and hype” around 3D printing, but the systems available now have two big challenges, Whitman said at HP’s shareholder meeting. One is that they’re deathly slow.

“It’s like watching ice melt,” she said.

The other, according to Whitman, is that the quality isn’t as good as it should be. “The surface of the substrate is not perfect,” she said.

“We believe we have solved both these problems and we’ll be making a big technology announcement in June around how we are going to approach this,” Whitman said.

That doesn’t mean HP will release products at that time, but it implies the company will show what it’s working on and where it’s heading.

Whitman said it will target the business market first, where it thinks there’s demand for systems that can be used to print prototypes and finished products.

HP knows printing, but can they win with 3D Printing? (Full disclosure, I used to at HP, in the Imaging and Printing division, several years ago.) They have a lot of tech and understanding in printing technology. (Their LaserJet and InkJet printers are the most profitable IT products EVER!) They probably also have a lot of IP that will help them in this space.

But the fact that this is yet another B2B Enterprise play, is worrying to me. Yes, 3D Printing as a service will be where the majority of this market is headed, but the innovation and use cases is driven by the hackers and makers. By targeting B2B, they’ll never get ahead of this trend and will forever be chasing it. Unless they come out with something truly revolutionary, like multi-material, complex printing, at a fraction of the current cost, I wouldn’t expect HP to be a major player in this space. They haven’t even been able to get ahead of electrical conducting printing (circuits) by hacking an ink-jet printer. Why didn’t HP do that?