The love of knowledge is a kind of madness.
― C.S. Lewis, Out of the Silent Planet

brucesterling:

*Ha ha ha, so long 2013

The future is now!

brucesterling:

*Ha ha ha, so long 2013

The future is now!

Moxyland: South African Cyberpunk is a Beautifully Disturbing Thing. | Book Punk
I’ve found because Moxyland came out much later in the US, a lot of American cyberpunk fans haven’t read it. 

Moxyland: South African Cyberpunk is a Beautifully Disturbing Thing. | Book Punk

I’ve found because Moxyland came out much later in the US, a lot of American cyberpunk fans haven’t read it. 

Meanwhile, the companies we do pay directly as customers often treat us with disregard at best, abuse at worst (just think about your cable provider or your bank). Of course, we shouldn’t just accept online commercial exploitation just because exploitation in general has been around for ages. Rather, we should acknowledge that exploitation only partly explains today’s anxiety with online services.

Hyperemployment, or the Exhausting Work of the Technology User - Ian Bogost - The Atlantic (via treblekicker)

The article makes an excellent point. Thanks to tech advances, even the super diligent single-tasker is doing dozens of “jobs” in todays workplace. 

(via treblekicker)

10 Famous Creative Minds That Didn’t Quit Their Day Jobs

Kurt Vonnegut worked at a car dealer after publishing his first novel, and Philip Glass worked as a plumber while crafting his music. So while you may be itching to ditch your 9 to 5, take a lesson from these legendary creatives and pursue your passions while still collecting a pay check.

Stephen King is another one. In fact most writers are probably in that boat. 

10 Famous Creative Minds That Didn’t Quit Their Day Jobs

Kurt Vonnegut worked at a car dealer after publishing his first novel, and Philip Glass worked as a plumber while crafting his music. So while you may be itching to ditch your 9 to 5, take a lesson from these legendary creatives and pursue your passions while still collecting a pay check.

Stephen King is another one. In fact most writers are probably in that boat. 

Edge Of Tomorrow Official Trailer 

It’s like 12 Monkeys meets Battle: Los Angeles. In fact the trailer for Edge of Tomorrow even uses the same song as the trailer for Battle: Los Angeles

A robot just called me so that another robot could deliver a message

I got a call from my doctor’s office reminding me about my appointment on Friday. Except it was an automated call so when I answered a computerized voice told me to wait for an important message from my doctor. Then another computerized voice came on the line and told me about my visit. 

The singularity is here. 

Newbury and Hobbes Investigates The Affinity Bridge | Book Punk
My latest steampunk book review. 
This 10-Step Guide To Surviving The Smog In China Is So Depressing
Wow. Seriously? Just wow. 
At least 7,776 languages are in use in the greater offline world … Less than five percent of languages in use now exist online.

How the Internet is killing the world’s languages (via courtenaybird)

One would think the Internet could save languages, but it doesn’t seem to be doing that. I hope we get to the point where browsers just auto-translate every page for us into language we may read. 

(via emergentfutures)

Now There’s a Zombie Drone That Hunts, Controls, and Kills Other Drones

When 27-year-old Samy Kamkar—a security researcher who famously made one million Myspace friends in a single day—heard the announcement on Sunday that Amazon was planning to start delivering packages via drone in 2015, he had an idea. He knew that whenever new technology, like drones, becomes popular quickly, there are bound to be security flaws. And he claims that he found one within 24 hours and promptly exploited it: America, meet the zombie drone that Kamkar says hunts, hacks, and takes over nearby drones. With enough hacks, a user can allegedly control an entire zombie drone army capable of flying in any direction, taking video of your house, or committing mass drone-suicide. 

Of course there is. 

Now There’s a Zombie Drone That Hunts, Controls, and Kills Other Drones

When 27-year-old Samy Kamkar—a security researcher who famously made one million Myspace friends in a single day—heard the announcement on Sunday that Amazon was planning to start delivering packages via drone in 2015, he had an idea. He knew that whenever new technology, like drones, becomes popular quickly, there are bound to be security flaws. And he claims that he found one within 24 hours and promptly exploited it: America, meet the zombie drone that Kamkar says hunts, hacks, and takes over nearby drones. With enough hacks, a user can allegedly control an entire zombie drone army capable of flying in any direction, taking video of your house, or committing mass drone-suicide. 

Of course there is. 

Laptop battery is at 11% but my power cord is upstairs. It’s like a game of chicken. 

Sherlock Holmes vs. Iron Man - I Hear of Sherlock Everywhere
Here is my latest Sherlock Holmes book review. 

Sherlock Holmes vs. Iron Man - I Hear of Sherlock Everywhere

Here is my latest Sherlock Holmes book review. 

The rise and fall of the letter E on the Internet. 

As recently as 1998, the letter was voted both “Word of the Year” and “Most Likely to Succeed” by the American Dialect Society. (It narrowly defeated the phrase “sexual relations” by a vote of 31 to 28.) In awarding the distinction, the organization noted the letter’s prolific role in words describing burgeoning online technology like e-mail, e-commerce, and e-tailing. But in 2004, Stewart Butterfield and Caterina Fake founded Flickr, a photograph-sharing application, without the standard penultimate E. “The most compelling reason to remove the E,” explained Ms. Fake, “was that we were unable to acquire the domain Flicker.com … The rest of the team were more in favor of other options, such as ‘FlickerIt’ or ‘FlickerUp’ but somehow, through persuasion or arm-twisting, I prevailed.” It was good news for the company but bad news for the letter. A year later, the company was acquired by Yahoo for $35 million. Soon many startups began jettisoning their Es like toxic assets. In 2009, Grindr, a geosocial network application for gay men, chose to make do without the letter E. Membership quickly swelled. Myriad other brands followed suit, including Blendr, Gathr, Pixlr, Readr, Timr, Viewr, Pushr.

(via An Obituary for the Letter E | Underwire | Wired.com)
E had an interesting career over the internet. 

The rise and fall of the letter E on the Internet. 

As recently as 1998, the letter was voted both “Word of the Year” and “Most Likely to Succeed” by the American Dialect Society. (It narrowly defeated the phrase “sexual relations” by a vote of 31 to 28.) In awarding the distinction, the organization noted the letter’s prolific role in words describing burgeoning online technology like e-mail, e-commerce, and e-tailing. But in 2004, Stewart Butterfield and Caterina Fake founded Flickr, a photograph-sharing application, without the standard penultimate E. “The most compelling reason to remove the E,” explained Ms. Fake, “was that we were unable to acquire the domain Flicker.com … The rest of the team were more in favor of other options, such as ‘FlickerIt’ or ‘FlickerUp’ but somehow, through persuasion or arm-twisting, I prevailed.” It was good news for the company but bad news for the letter. A year later, the company was acquired by Yahoo for $35 million. Soon many startups began jettisoning their Es like toxic assets. In 2009, Grindr, a geosocial network application for gay men, chose to make do without the letter E. Membership quickly swelled. Myriad other brands followed suit, including Blendr, Gathr, Pixlr, Readr, Timr, Viewr, Pushr.

(via An Obituary for the Letter E | Underwire | Wired.com)

E had an interesting career over the internet.